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Item ID: tp0006   Source ID: 2

Description: Our customizable tear sheet pads feature detailed content approved by URAC's Health Web Site Accreditation Program combined with educational medical illustrations. Tear sheets are proven, inexpensive handouts that facilitate informed consent and improve patient compliance while functioning as a valuable branding and contact information tool. Product Specifications: 8.5 x 11 inches, 50 tear sheets, two-sided information (full color front side, one-color back side), printed on heavy white stock, sturdy cardboard back, detailed medical illustrations in color and continuous tone, space available for overprinting of contact information (additional charge may apply). This tear sheet pad contains the following information: A surgical... More

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Our customizable tear sheet pads feature detailed content approved by URAC's Health Web Site Accreditation Program combined with educational medical illustrations. Tear sheets are proven, inexpensive handouts that facilitate informed consent and improve patient compliance while functioning as a valuable branding and contact information tool. Product Specifications: 8.5 x 11 inches, 50 tear sheets, two-sided information (full color front side, one-color back side), printed on heavy white stock, sturdy cardboard back, detailed medical illustrations in color and continuous tone, space available for overprinting of contact information (additional charge may apply). This tear sheet pad contains the following information: A surgical procedure to remove a diseased or injured knee joint and insert an artificial joint. Reasons for Procedure Knee replacement becomes an option for treating a damaged knee when pain and stiffness limit normal activities and are not relieved by other measures, such as rest, medications, or physical therapy. The procedure is most often performed to: • Alleviate knee pain and disability due to osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or previous severe knee injury • Correct a knee deformity (knee bows in or out) Risk Factors for Complications During the Procedure • Obesity • Urinary tract infection or dental or gum disease (each will increase the risk of bacteria entering the bloodstream and infecting the joint) • Diabetes • Pre-existing medical condition • Taking steroid medication What to Expect Prior to Procedure Your doctor will likely do the following: • Blood tests • Physical exam • Possibly, MRI scan - a test that uses magnetic waves to make pictures of the inside of the body • X-rays of joint In the time leading up to your procedure: • Arrange for a ride to and from the hospital and medical appointments • Arrange for help at home after returning from the hospital • If you are overweight, lose some weight to decrease the amount of stress on your new joint • Make home modifications to help make recovery easier: • Consider creating a temporary living space on one floor, since climbing up and down stairs will be difficult at first • Install safety bars, a raised toilet seat with arms, a shower bench and shower hose, and handrails on stairways and steps • Purchase a stable, firm-backed arm chair and a footstool • Remove throw rugs and extension cords • Patients often need blood during surgery; consider donating your own blood before the procedure • Review your regular medications with the surgeon and follow instructions if asked to discontinue some drugs During Procedure - IV fluids, blood, anesthesia, possibly sedation Anesthesia - General, spinal, or epidural Description of the Procedure The surgeon makes an incision and removes damaged cartilage and bone. The remaining bone is prepared to receive the new plastic and metal joint, which is placed in proper position and cemented within the bone. The incision is closed with stitches or staples and a drain is left in to allow extra fluid to flow out. A splint holds the knee in proper position. Blood and fluid loss from this surgery are often significant, and may require blood transfusions. You will be given IV antibiotics during surgery, and for several days after. After Procedure Urinary catheter, splint or brace How Long Will It Take? About two hours Will It Hurt? Anesthesia prevents pain during surgery. You may experience pain during recovery but you will receive pain medication to relieve this discomfort. Possible Complications: • Anesthesia-related problems • Blood clots in a leg or pelvic vein that may travel to the lungs • Excessive swelling or bleeding • Infection • Injury to nearby nerves or blood vessels • Reaction to the implant (the knee replacement) Average Hospital Stay - 3–6 days Postoperative Care: • A physical therapist will help you perform specific knee exercises, usually starting the day after surgery. You'll be taught safe and painless ways to stand, sit, lie, walk, and otherwise move the knee and support your weight. • Do not take over-the-counter remedies without your surgeon's approval. • Keep the incision area clean and dry, and place a dressing over the incision to protect it from irritation. • Move your foot and ankle to increase venous blood flow back to your heart. • Stitches or staples will be removed in a few weeks. • You may be given special support hose to wear that may help prevent blood clots from forming in your legs. • You may be sent home with blood-thinning medications. • You may need to wear a brace or splint; you will be taught to use a walker, crutches, or other support device until your leg is healed enough to support your weight. • You will gradually progress to walking and then to climbing stairs. • You'll probably be sent home with oral antibiotics; take all of the pills prescribed. • Your leg may be placed in a continuous passive motion (CPM) machine that slowly moves your knee, restoring function, decreasing swelling, and improving circulation. Outcome Within six weeks, you should be able to resume normal light activities and driving. You may feel a soft clicking in the joint when walking or bending. By following the recommended activity and rehabilitation program you can speed your recovery and protect future joint function. Maintain a healthy weight, and refrain from jogging and other high-impact sports, which can increase wear on the joint, cause it to loosen, and increase pain. You'll need antibiotics before dental procedures to decrease the risk of bacteria entering the bloodstream and traveling to the prosthesis. Call Your Doctor If Any of the Following Occurs • Cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, or severe nausea or vomiting • Numbness or tingling in your leg, foot, or toes • Pain and/or swelling in your feet, calves, or legs, or sudden shortness of breath or chest pain • Pain, burning, urgency, frequency of urination, or persistent bleeding in the urine • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or discharge from the incision site • Signs of infection, including fever and chills • Your leg, foot, or toes appear chalky white, blue, or black

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